THE SEAWELL BUOY

Abundant freshwater for over 5,000 homes.

The patented SeaWell Buoy is a game-changer for producing freshwater.  This technology advances beyond shoreside mega-desalination plants to environmentally friendly, dispersed, floating seawater conversion buoys, each delivering freshwater for over 5,000 homes with unrivaled energy efficiency.

THE SEAWELL BUOY

Reliable and affordable water reduces the human and environmental stress caused by water scarcity. SeaWell provides easy-to-install, modular floating, reverse osmosis buoys for conversion of seawater to freshwater directly from the ocean.

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RELIABLE BULK FRESH WATER

A single SeaWell 150 Buoy produces enough water per year to fill a 10-acre reservoir, 95 feet deep (950 acre-feet)...about 350 million gallons.  Buoys can be quickly installed, adding capacity when and where needed, avoiding the long construction time of conventional plants.

ENERGY EFFICIENT & ENVIRONMENTALLY SOUND

Energy-efficient Buoys are lightly dispersed along the coast, close to communities using the water. Seawater low-velocity inflow screens avoid marine life impingement, while novel dispersal of residual brine from desalinating the seawater, assures quick dilution to ambient salinity well above the seafloor. Freshwater supply for 15,000+ people, produced by the SeaWell Buoy and pumped to a shoreside Water Station.

THE WATER STATION

The water-power link between the ocean source and coastal communities is the Water Station, which connects the Buoy(s) by seabed power cables and water pipelines and provides treatment to meet potable water requirements.

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ICONIC

The iconic lighthouse-inspired structure typically needs less than ¼-acre and can connect multiple SeaWell Buoys, with water delivery within a few weeks of commissioning.

HELPING SOLVE CALIFORNIA'S WATER EMERGENCY

The vast systems of canals, pipelines and reservoirs built in the 1960s aimed to mitigate water scarcity in Southern California. Now, in the “new normal” of increasingly limited precipitation and snowpack, State water is not sufficient and does not offer the emergency back-up originally intended.